How can I clear the algea out of my pond?

| July 30, 2013 | 4 Comments

Question by bxchk: How can I clear the algea out of my pond?
I am purchasing a house that has a small rock pond in the front yard. I am told that there are some fish in the pond, but from the looks of the algae, I believe they are long gone. The algae has grown on the rocks under the water, and appears to have covered the entire liner of the pond. The house is in Florida and has lots of shade over the pond. There is no filter or pump on the pond. The algae looks like the normal algae that grows in stagnant water.

Is there something that I can do to clean out the algae short of completely draining the pond and starting over (and without killing any fish that might be in the pond)?

Best answer:

Answer by dustinm417
With an algecide. You might check at the hardware store.

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  1. crystalshannon516 says:

    Lyme works great. We use it here for large ponds but i’m sure it would do the same for a small one. After putting the lyme in it for a couple of days I would suggest putting in a filtration system of some sort or you will just keep having to add lyme monthly…. But this will keep you from having to drain and get you hands dirty…

  2. anabelezenith says:

    Put some barley straw in a mesh bag and put it into the water. It has to be barley; the reason why it works isn’t known but it does! This is better than chemicals are it is organic and doesn’t harm fish and plantlife

    You can get it on ebay – http://search.ebay.co.uk/barley-straw_W0QQfcclZ1QQfclZ4QQfnuZ1QQfsooZ1QQfsopZ1

  3. stock_yardman says:

    try putting in roundup or ab-it of bleach

  4. itsnotarealname says:

    For surface, or “string” algae, you have a couple choices. There are algaecides which can work for ponds, but do be careful, as too much can kill fish, and the algae serves to help break down the nitrates, as well as being good food for the fish. Some scrubbing is certainly in order if possible. I’ve had some limited luck with Barley hay, but if you’ve got full sun, that’s not going to cut it. A third option (during warmer months) is to get a plecostomas or two. They won’t eliminate the algae, but they’ll eat enough to keep it under control. The last option (and least attractive) is a water dye, sold at most garden centers. It’ll give the water a deep blue tint and reduce the amount of light reaching the bottom/edges of the pond. But it’s not a nice color blue… It looks like the water in airplane lavatories.

    You might want to see about putting a tree or something near the pond to give it some shade and reduce the amount of sun it gets.

    Is the water cloudy too? If you’ve got that much algae you might have “pea soup” for water. In that case, I recommend a UVC (ultra-violet clarifier.) It’s about $ 100 and hooks onto a typical pump. The UV exposure will kill the suspended algae. Note, though, that you still need the biological filter to remove the dead algae.

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